Dick Colon, a member of the White House Boys, walks through the grave site of fellow inmates at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys, following ceremonies dedicating a memorial to the suffering of the White House Boys in 2008.

  • Twenty-seven “clandestine” graves were found on a property adjacent to the Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Florida. 
  • The newly found graves increase the total discovered burials near campus to 82. The school is accused of carrying out abuses on students between 1900 and 1973. 
  • Dozier, which closed permanently in 2011, served as an alternative school for delinquent and orphans youths and a number of former students have spoken out about abuse.
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More than two dozen possible graves were discovered near a notorious reform school in Florida known for carrying out abuses for more than a half a century, the Miami Herald reported.

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Workers were preparing to clean up a fuel storage site adjacent to the Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Florida, when the 27 “clandestine”” graves were discovered.

The graves increase the total discovered burials near campus to 82, though researchers believe more than 100 deaths occurred at Dozier between 1900 and 1973.

Dozier, which closed permanently in 2011, served as an alternative school for delinquent and orphans youths, but a number of former students known as the “White House Boys” have detailed the alleged abuses they faced at the school.

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Former students have said they were beaten, forced to lay on filthy cots, and taken to a “rape room” to be sexually assaulted. Other students have said they knew children had been killed on campus.

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When the campus closed in 2011, the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Decision reported “systemic, egregious and dangerous practices exacerbated by a lack of accountability and controls.”

Gov. Ron DeSantis said he plans to ask state agencies to “develop a path forward” to investigate the graves.

“Representatives of these agencies will be reaching out to meet with county officials as the first step to understanding and addressing these preliminary findings,” DeSantis said, according to the Herald.

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